fuck yeah sex education




Sex Positive and Body Positive educational place. Includes information about different relationships, genders, sexuality, sexual preferences, safety precautions and everything else that could pertain in the education of sex. Accepting of all walks of life.
If you have any questions, feel free to ask on my ask site: http://fyseq.tumblr.com/ask, though check out http://fuckyeahsexeducation.tumblr.com/FAQ!


"Adults train kids to become sexually mature in a manner they approve of. We clap and laugh over all the little moments meant to prepare them for this; we give them gender appropriate toys that will prepare little boys for a manhood of tools and trucks and little girls for a womanhood of kitchens and babies, not to mention makeup and high heels. We take “kissing cousin” photos of little boys and girls mimicking grownup sexual behavior and proudly frame them or put them in our wallets to show strangers because children mimicking adult sexual behavior is adorable (so long as it’s the correct sexual behavior). We teach little boys that they’re not supposed to cry and we teach little girls to spend their lives wondering what men are thinking of them. The second the physical aspects of sexual maturity start sprouting, we organize social events to push them toward each other; first, the fumbling and terrifying middle school dances, then the process gets increasingly formal the closer the kids get to maturity: freshman dances, sophomore dances, proms and homecomings, all to push them toward that aisle, and the socially approved method of romantic love and baby-making."
Glee Season 2 Episode 6: Never Been Kissed | Tom & Lorenzo (via sociolab)

(via becauseiamawoman)

"I really hate when people say gender is just “in the mind” or “in your head”. It’s really reductionist and it always comes from cis people. Gender is experiential and interactive, and moreover real. Asserting that gender is some sort of mental construction that doesn’t take place outside of your mind invalidates the hell that trans people go through for just existing within ourselves."

autumn-and-eve (via indigocrayon)

This, almost 100%, however Gender is considered a ‘Social Construct’, it doesn’t make it any less real. Just because ‘Money’ is a Social Construct, it doesn’t make wealthy or poverty any less real. We would never go to a poor person and inform them to just forget about the existence of money, simply because ‘it’s in the mind’.

Just because we as a society might place more or less weight on something, never invalidates it’s existence. Things of value (gold, platinum, etc) whose worth is represented by paper money derive that worth not just arbitrarily, but the sheer volume of effort that has went into procuring them and how we choose to value their uniqueness.

The same goes for gender, we should value that choice, that uniqueness, the sheer volume of effort that every human being goes through in relationship to gender. This goes even more so for trans* and gender variant people.

(via sexreeducated)

(via holisticsexualhealth)

"The prohibition against talking about menstruation—shh…that’s dirty; that’s gross; pretend it’s not going on; just clean it up—breeds a climate where corporations, like femcare companies and pharmaceutical companies, like the makers of Lybrel and Seasonique, can develop and market products of questionable safety. They can conveniently exploit women’s body shame and self-hatred. And we see this, by the way, when it comes to birthing, breastfeeding, birth control and health care in general. The medical industrial complex depends on our ignorance and discomfort with our bodies."

From an interview with Chris Bobel about her book New Blood: Third Wave Feminism and the Politics of Menstruation. Cited by Lester Andrist in Sociological Cinema. Read the rest of Andrist’s article, which focuses on the portrayal of menstruation as a comical point of disgust in the film Superbad and as shameful in the film Carrie. (via zeezeescorner)

FYSE Edit: One note, is that actually birth control that enables you to skip periods aren’t dangerous in any way. The only reason why birth control was made for a week period was to keep you an a cycle your body was used to. It’s not necessary since you don’t ovulate and don’t build up the uterine lining that is shed during menstruation. There are also people that don’t like their periods, I’m one of them. My periods are painful and awful and they remind me that I can procreate and that my body is seen as female. It’s fine to not want to be reminded that you have a period but we need to be able to talk about bodily functions and be able to learn about them.

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

"The prohibition against talking about menstruation—shh…that’s dirty; that’s gross; pretend it’s not going on; just clean it up—breeds a climate where corporations, like femcare companies and pharmaceutical companies, like the makers of Lybrel and Seasonique, can develop and market products of questionable safety. They can conveniently exploit women’s body shame and self-hatred. And we see this, by the way, when it comes to birthing, breastfeeding, birth control and health care in general. The medical industrial complex depends on our ignorance and discomfort with our bodies."

From an interview with Chris Bobel about her book New Blood: Third Wave Feminism and the Politics of Menstruation. Cited by Lester Andrist in Sociological Cinema. Read the rest of Andrist’s article, which focuses on the portrayal of menstruation as a comical point of disgust in the film Superbad and as shameful in the film Carrie. (via zeezeescorner)

FYSE: One note, is that actually birth control that enables you to skip periods aren’t dangerous in any way. The only reason why birth control was made for a week period was to keep you an a cycle your body was used to. It’s not necessary since you don’t ovulate and don’t build up the uterine lining that is shed during menstruation. There are also people that don’t like their periods, I’m one of them. My periods are painful and awful and they remind me that I can procreate and that my body is seen as female. It’s fine to not want to be reminded that you have a period but we need to be able to talk about bodily functions and be able to learn about them.

(via becauseiamawoman)

"Regardless of your professional affiliation, if you hear someone claiming that fish of a certain gender are “sneaky” and “mimics,” that bisexual men do not exist, that women are innately bad at math, that trans* people are mentally ill, or that a certain gender or sexuality is “alternative,” you should speak up. These phrases are all too common. Given mainstream culture’s (and particularly corporate media’s) tendency to embrace “expert” opinions that confirm existing biases, it is vital for other “experts” to step forward to challenge flawed and frequently bigoted research. Part of being a member of the academy involves having confidence in your own mental capabilities. We should all be able to recognize the difference between technical mistakes in each other’s fields and inexcusable personal biases. Failing to speak out and, yes, to listen to “other people’s” complaints is not acceptable—it is nothing short of enabling injustice."
— Kate Forbes, “‘Do These Earrings Make Me Look Dumb?’: Diversity, Privilege, and Heteronormative Perceptions of Competence within the Academy” (via feministsociology)

(via becauseiamawoman)

"A new study from Social Studies of Science… reveals that when men chair committees that select scientific awards recipients, males win the awards more than 95% of the time. This new study also reports that while in the past two decades women have begun to win more awards for their scientific achievements, compared to men, they win more service and teaching awards and fewer prestigious scholarly awards than would be expected based on their representation in the nomination pool."

Women’s scientific achievements often overlooked and undervalued

This is a problem. The authors of the study don’t argue that there’s a sexist conspiracy to prevent the ascent of women, and I wouldn’t either. But the findings mean that we have to take into account the bias that undoubtedly exists in our society, and which scientists aren’t immune from. 

h/t justaturnofhtedial

(via sciencecenter)

(via becauseiamawoman)

captain-sonic:

African-American Boys Receive Less Attention, Lower Grades And Harsher Punishment In School

socialworky:

“A recent study by the Yale University Child Study Center shows that Black children — especially boys — no matter their family income, receive less attention, harsher punishment and lower marks in school than their White counterparts from kindergarten all the way through college. A subsequent article published in “The Washington Post” reported that Black children in the Washington, D.C. area are suspended or expelled two to five times more often than White children. It’s a national trend that needs to be addressed.”

I’ve seen first hand this kind of prejudice in the education system, which is one of the reasons why I’m so passionate about education. No child should be treated like they are inferior to another. Not only does this affect their education, but also their entire lives into adulthood.

the-sexpert:

Do Teen Sleepovers Prevent Pregnancy?

likelyhealthy:

Sociologist Dr. Amy Schalet discusses how teen sleepovers prevent pregnancy and, more importantly, how opening dialogue between parents and teens about sex and relationships will help improve sexual decision-making.  She is the author of the book “Not Under My Roof”.  Follow the link to watch the interview.

(Source: thesocietypages.org, via )

"If the ‘war’ here is taken to be the struggle to achieve legal provision for same sex marriage, then tactical acceptance that homosexuality may be genetically determined seems sensible, as it is likely to strengthen the argument that laws against same-sex marriage represent discrimination against a minority group.

But as the ‘war’ is construed more widely, it becomes more difficult to argue thecase for accepting the trade-off that this position seems to imply: if the ‘war’ is taken to be the struggle for widespread public acceptance that people’s sexual orientations lie on a spectrum, and that social institutions should operate to support people in the expression of these orientations, whatever these may be, then the Civil Partnerships Act may represent a retreat (because it can be seen as serving to further embed discrimination between gay and heterosexual people)."

Trade-offs in the gay rights movement

great article on how the efforts to portray sexual orientation as pre-determined and fixed has negative effects when trying to fight for human rights on political grounds

(via tooyoungforthelivingdead)

(via tooyoungforthelivingdead)

Article - "Becoming a Gendered Body: Practices of Preschool"

newwavefeminism:

Karin A. Martin

Many feminist  scholars  argue  that  the seeming  naturalness  of gender  differences,  particularly  bodily  difference,  underlies  gender  inequality.  Yet few  researchers  ask  how  these  bodily  differences  are  constructed.  Through semi-structured  observation  in five  preschool  classrooms,  I examine  one  way that everyday  movements,  comportment,  and  use  of physical  space  become gendered.  I find  that  the  hidden  school  curriculum  that  controls children’s bodily  practices  in  order  to  shape  them  cognitively  serves  another  purpose as  well.  This hidden  curriculum  also  turns children  who  are similar  in bodily comportment,  movement,  and  practice  into  girls  and  boys-children  whose bodily  practices  differ.  I  identify five  sets  of practices  that  create  these  differences:  dressing  up, permitting  relaxed  behaviors  or  requiring  formal  behaviors,  controlling  voices,  verbal  and  physical  instructions  regarding children’s  bodies  by teachers,  and physical  interactions  among  children.  This hidden  curriculum  that  (partially)  creates  bodily  differences  between  the genders  also  makes  these physical  differences  appear  and feel  natural. 

Interesting article that details the ways in which preschool teachers instill an ethic of “boys will be boys” and female submissiveness.

(via genderqueer)