fuck yeah sex education




Sex Positive and Body Positive educational place. Includes information about different relationships, genders, sexuality, sexual preferences, safety precautions and everything else that could pertain in the education of sex. Accepting of all walks of life.
If you have any questions, feel free to ask on my ask site: http://fyseq.tumblr.com/ask, though check out http://fuckyeahsexeducation.tumblr.com/FAQ!


"hen"
Sweden is on its way to gender equality and all it took was this 3-letter word  (via micdotcom)

(via outforhealth)

jonnybucklands:

Things Every Girl Should Know
collaterlysisters:

howtobeafuckinglady:

skinandbands:

howtobeafuckinglady:

tin-d0g:

xeansan:

camerongale:

drakensberg:

ttthegingerqueer:

Just filled out my health insurance forms!

yeah!!! fucking around with health insurance forms!!!!

I hate when people complain about “oh health forms are stupid they want my biological sex instead of my gender!!!!” or “they only have male or female!!!”
There’s a reason for that, you dumb fucks, and they’re referring to biological sex
Different health risks are present in different sexes, and whatever gender is in your head does not change the fact that if you were born female, you have a higher risk for certain cancers and osteoporosis, and if you were born male you have a higher risk for heart disease and often a shorter lifespan than a female.
In other words, your biological sex is an important factor in health and health insurance, and your special snowflake status doesn’t change that.

Coulda said it nicer but it’s true; it’s about health.

No. There gets a point where nice doesn’t work. There’s too many stupid ass angsty teens on here that are gonna get themselves seriously hurt or sick because they wanna be a special fucking snowflake. Lemme tell you a thing. Doctors don’t give a flying fuck what you identify as. All they want to know is do you have two X chromosomes or an XY? Because cancer and lupus and certain medicines don’t give a flying fuck what pronouns you use. This is about your fucking LIFE. stop being angsty for TWELVE SECONDS because when you’re in an ambulance or going into cardiac arrest or whatever the situation may be, it’s ESSENTIAL that you get your head out of your ass long enough to tell them your BIOLOGICAL SEX that you were BORN WITH. It literally may save your life.

this is all very violent imo 

It’s important

it’s not but ok lol

hi im one of those doctor types you idiots keep using as an excuse to yell at trans people
every single thing you’ve said is incorrect, and you do not know what you are talking about
I may need to know what organs a patient does or does not have, their hormonal status and history of exposure, and even their karyotype. Ideas like “biological sex” can often imply a lot of this. In medicine, that isn’t good enough. We have to be able to catch exceptions, side-effects, sequelae, and anomalies that might affect only one in a million patients. Exceptions to any one or more elements of the “biological sex” paradigm are much, much, much, much more common than that.
You genuinely do not know a patient’s chromosomes until you’ve run an expensive test, and even then, who knows! they could be a mosaic. Whether this information is important, and when, and why, depends. It all completely depends. A gender/sex/whatever marker on a form is not and never will be important. No matter how you cut it, is and always will be a miniscule source of information. Frankly, by disclosing a trans background on this form, the OP has made it more diagnostically useful to a clinician than that form has ever been before - we trans people are statistically very uncommon and tend to encounter distinct hardships and challenges that are highly relevant to our medical needs. Even then, it would still be no substitute for actually interviewing the patient.
So that’s the other thing you House addicts don’t have a clue about. Good doctors do “give a flying fuck” about how the patient identifies, because a patient’s background is absolutely key to their health. Knowing a patient’s basic demographics can help me think about what may be more or less likely in terms of their care needs.
More importantly, it helps me treat my patient with respect. This is both the decent thing to do and an absolute minimum requirement for being able to get anything done. You sneering choads couldn’t cure a side of beef.

Target's Response To My Calling Out Their Girls' Clothing Problem

Submission: Coming Out Story

This is not a happy story, so if you’re sensitive to negativity, I want to warn you right now: it has happy moments, but it is not a happy story.

I first came out on the forums of Scarleteen. If you’re not aware, the forums are completely anonymous and giving your personal information is forbidden, but I needed to share in some small way that I was genderqueer. I had already mentioned a few times at school that I was pansexual, but at school that was not an uncommon thing. Genderqueer was a much bigger deal since I knew that I wasn’t comfortable with he/him pronouns anymore and I was sick of trying to pretend to be a man. 

I came out next at work and that was largely a positive experience. I wore a skirt, some makeup, and my confidant co-worker helped me paint my nails. My co-workers and supervisors were super awesome. One guy asked about my skirt and I told him I was coming out. He said, “that’s cool. I don’t think it matters so much who you love, just as long as you love someone”. Granted, he was confusing sexual orientation and gender identity, but his sentiment was in the right place. 

Later that night I posted pictures on tumblr and wrote some stuff about the experience. Most of my followers were very encouraging and all that. No problems, nothing. About a week later I get an e-mail informing me that I had to go to a meeting with staff worker of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (I was a student leader in the organization). As it turns out, those pictures and the story of the day I came out at work were the nail in my coffin (so to speak). A scheming little goody-two-shoe Christian had been gathering stuff from my blog to use as “evidence” in case against me.

Long short of it, I was kicked out leadership and basically told that unless I repented of my “lifestyle” I would not be welcome in leadership again. At that point I didn’t feel safe anymore with that group so I left and had to wander (spiritually) for a long time. I’m in a better place now, but it’s been a painful journey getting to where I am now and this story is what started it all.

Gender Expression, Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation

fuckyeahsexeducation:

Q: Gender might be a social construct but sex isnt

A:

Sex is determined by doctors based on your genitals. If you have something close enough to what they believe males should have you’re called a male. If you have something close enough to what they believe females should have you’re called…

figured today was a good day to share my gender and orientation FAQ.

Any other questions or subjects that should be included?

rambleonamazon:

assignedmale:

"When did you decide to be female/male?" #questionscisfolksneverhear

Such a simple concept. I have no idea why it confuses so many cis people.
The times I have tried to explain being transgender from my perspective, it’s met with confused stares and questions like “Why would your parents decide to raise you as a boy if you had a vagina?”
And I’d respond “No, I didn’t have a vagina. I had a penis.”
"Oh, so you were a boy! Why didn’t you just say so?"
"Because I wasn’t!"

Language Tips for Cis Feminists Speaking on Trans Issues

phanapoeia:

unpitchable:

Over the past two years, I’ve shared a lot of space with cisgender feminists who are seeking to add a trans voice to their panel, event, or conference. I can often sense that these feminists’ hearts are in the right place with regards to trans issues. They’re trying and their effort is real but they’re still struggling to work past some conceptual issues that might affect their language.

So let’s start with the language and work backwards. Trans-inclusive cisgender feminists still have some pretty pernicious habits of language that stubbornly persist in their vocabulary.

Many friends and colleagues have written or tweeted about this problematic language but, much like I did in this frequently shared post on the sex/gender distinction, I wanted to compose a handy reference for cisgender feminists who know they want to be trans-inclusive and have learned some basic vocabulary, but want to learn “how to talk about it” without setting off any alarm bells.

1) Please remove the phrases “female-identified,” “male-identified,””female-bodied,” and “male-bodied” from your vocabulary.

These phrases are my number one pet peeve. Often the people using them think that they’re being really good by using these phrases instead of saying “women” and “men.” What they don’t know is that these phrases have a troubled, transphobic history and carry a lot of conceptual baggage. In their current instantiation, people who use these phrases are often just hypercorrecting, using language that is technically incorrect because it “sounds good.”

But why are they bad? “Female-identified” is a phrase that needlessly divides women with different body types from one another. When combined with language like “female-bodied,” “female-identified” carries with it the suggestion that women without vaginas are not really women, that they only identify as such in spite of their “male” bodies.

Bodies, furthermore, are not inherently male or female. Sex assignment is a social process governed largely by more-or-less arbitrary medical conventions surrounding ideal, normative genital appearance and heterosexual reproductive viability. The rigidity of our society’s two-sex system is by no means a natural outgrowth of our bodily characteristics: it’s our commitment to a two-gender system mapped in reverse onto our bodies.

“But chromsomes!” you might say. Nope. The things that you have learned and internalized about the sex of the human body are so affected by our social ideologies that they cannot be separated from them.

Even if distinctions like male/female-bodied vs. male/female identified were non-invasive or politically expedient (they’re neither), they also are semantically meaningless when we consider the full range of bodies that the category women includes. An intersex woman, for example, might not have a body that correlates with the full connotations of the phrase “female-bodied,” but may not have born with a penis, either.

Transgender women who have undergone genital reassignment surgery also frustrate the way in which “female-bodied” is used as a distinction between cisgender and transgender women: they have breasts, they have vaginas, and their bodies do not natively produce substantial quantities of testosterone. They don’t have a uterus, sure, but many cisgender women are born without a uterus as well.

By conventional and socially dominant methods of visible measurement, these bodies are female. But I’m pretty sure that people who use the phrase “female-bodied” are intending to exclude these bodies when they deploy that language.

What’s the solution to all this confusion? It’s easier than you might think. “Women” is a category that includes a variety of gender expressions and bodies. It will do just fine when you want to talk about women. “Men” is a category that includes a variety of gender expressions and bodies. It will do just fine when you want to talk about men.

You might not think it’s that simple, however. Feminism and other progressive political movements rightly engage with bodies in their political activism. Feminism, for example, focuses on reproductive justice and healthcare. How can we talk about sex, bodies, and reproduction without drawing lines between transgender women and cisgender women’s bodies?

Easy. When you want to talk about gender, talk about gender. When you want to talk about body politics, talk about bodies. If you want to talk about issues that affect people with vaginas, for example, you’re talking about both men and women.

And, as Katherine Cross observes on Feministing, feminism should fully integrate a focus on transgender women’s reproductive rights and healthcare with a focus on issues like abortion and birth control. Trans women’s bodies are women’s bodies and they deserve a place in the mainstream of feminist body politics and reproductive justice efforts.

To summarize, then, phrases like “female-identified” and “female-bodied” are biologically reductionist, needlessly divisive, and functionally meaningless. If you feel like they are necessary to engage in your form of feminist body politics, it’s time to shake up your body politics. EIther way, please quit using these phrases.

2) Please do not list “women” and “trans women” as different categories when listing marginalized groups or talking about oppression.

Separating out “trans women” from “women” carries with it the suggestion that a “trans woman” is not a woman unmodified, that she is a different kind of person entirely. “Women” is allowed to stand alone as an unquestioned and unmarked category while “trans women” are marked as the Other to a de facto group of cisgender women.

This linguistic habit also runs the risk of suggesting that trans women do not experience the same marginalization that women do. I most recently heard it used in the context of “I know what it’s like to be a woman but I don’t know what it’s like to be a trans woman.”

While there are forms of oppression that are unique to transgender people, transgender women share in cisgender women’s oppression. Sexual and domestic violence, street harassment, employment discrimination, body image issues, lack of access to reproductive health care, eating disorders, self-harm, the list goes on; if it affects cisgender women, it affects transgender women, too.

Furthermore, if you utter the word “women,” you are already including transgender women by definition. At that point, it’s up to you to be sure that your feminist politics also includes issues that acutely affect transgender women in particular such as police harassment, stop and frisk laws, gender identity inclusion in civil rights legislation, access to trans-inclusive healthcare, etc.

In some contexts where it’s necessary to highlight your own privilege, it might be worthwhile to note that you are unaware of the added layers of marginalization that transgender women experience. But do not do this at the expense of disavowing the common struggles of women, unmarked, unmodified, transgender and cisgender alike.

When you must speak to the specific issues that affect cisgender women and transgender women respectively, don’t leave your own womanhood unmarked while marking a transgender woman’s womanhood.

Transgender women’s particular struggles are yours too as a fellow woman; they’re not mythical, comprehension-defying.forms of oppression. If you’re a cisgender woman, you don’t get to speak from experience about transgender women’s specific oppression, true, nor do you have the authority to prescribe directions for transfeminist politics, but you also don’t get to mark transgender issues as a very important special interest compartment of feminism. They’re your issues, too.

3) Please do not self-label as “cisgender” unless you are directly commenting on your own privilege.

There are moments when one’s cisgender status needs to be acknowledged. When making claims about transgender people or speaking about transfeminist politics, it’s probably useful to let your audience know the location from which you’re speaking.

But don’t drop your “cisgender” status so much that it becomes an empty disclaimer. You do need to consider issues of authority and perspective, but please be aware that constantly reminding everyone that you’re cisgender is a way of highlighting differences between women rather than building community among them.

This is why I generally advise other women not to disclose their cisgender status on Facebook now that gender options have expanded unless they primarily use their Facebook as a political platform and feel it necessary to disclose their position of privilege.

4) Don’t make distinctions between sex and gender or use phrases like “biological woman” or “biowoman.”

I have written about this before: here and here. The justification for removing these phrases from your vocabulary follows point #1 in this piece as well.

***

The general lesson across all these points is: don’t draw distinctions between cisgender and transgender women unless you have to. When you do need to draw these distinctions, don’t use language that ties specific genders to specific kinds of bodies.

While I generally give most cisgender feminists who use this language the benefit of a doubt, I do want to mark a troubling mindset that often lurks behind these phrases and linguistic habits. If you’ve read through this article, clearly see what’s been happening with your language, and you’re ready to change it, congratulations! My work here is done.

If you were still encountering some internal resistance as you scrolled through this piece, read on:

Some cisgender feminists want to practice trans-inclusive politics, they know how to repeat the mantra “trans women are women” like it’s their job, but somewhere in their heart of hearts, they still approach a transgender woman on an interpersonal level as a different kind of woman. Somewhere, it still matters to them what kind of genitals another woman has. Somewhere, they don’t feel a transgender woman as their sister, they see her as an asterisk.

If this is you, you’ve got some internal work to do that goes beyond your use of language. You have to ask yourself what womanhood means to you, you have to internalize what it means for you personally that the category of “woman” includes people without vaginas or people who did not have them since birth, you have to examine and challenge your own cisnormative feelings of entitlement to know the intimate details of other women’s bodies. You have to figure out a way not just to say that transgender women are women, but to embrace transgender women as such in a way that is not tokenistic, condescending, or hollow. If this describes your position, start with the language and let your heart follow.

(Source: frufruscrub, via lydiamdeetz)

Any suggestions for good books, cartoons, toys, activities, and other child-rearing resources to help teach diversity to young children? Topics I’m especially interested in are race, orientation, gender, ability, and size. What other areas are important to cover?

Submission: Agender approved: cups & implant

I am a nonbinary (specifically agender) university student who was assigned female at birth, and I have found extreme satisfaction using both a menstrual cup and the birth control arm implant.

I’d heard about the cups from webcomic OhJoySexToy (a delightfully informative and sex-positive comic you should all be reading) so I thought I’d try it out. Due to a scheduling error, the very first time I used it I was on the heaviest day of my period, going without underwear in white short-shorts while ROCK CLIMBING. Seriously. It worked flawlessly!

It saves you money you’d otherwise spend on pads and tampons, who want you to believe they are the only options available - don’t believe their lies! It saves waste. It doesn’t give you Toxic Shock Syndrome like tampons, which can literally kill you! You can wear it when you’re not on your period to keep your underwear free of discharge. When you are on your period, it applies constant pressure to your vaginal walls, which can actually ease cramps! It is so comfortable that sometimes I have to check whether or not I remembered to put it in.

Now birth control. Once I began a sexual relationship with a cis man, I started using “the pill,” but I’m a huge daydreamer/procrastinator, so I was always terrified and paranoid I had slipped up at some point, no matter how thorough I had been. As a result, he and I always used condoms.

Looking for a “passive” birth control method (one that wouldn’t need regular maintenance on my part) I settled on the Nexplanon silicon rod implant, and I couldn’t be happier with it. It makes my period come far less often. It makes my period significantly lighter and less uncomfortable. At three years, it’s long-term. My student insurance paid for everything. Most importantly, it’s so effective and passive that I literally don’t have to think about it!

I have been recommending these every single time the topic comes up, and the combo lets my body feel most in line with my genderlessness (reducing dysphoria). My ask/submit is open if you have any questions - nothing is out of line! Try them out!

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